THROUGH THE ARCHIVES: From the News Letter of November 1855

Chaplains for the Crimea War

Friday, 20th November 2020, 9:00 am
A picture taken of General Pennefather along with his servant soldiers in the field during the Crimean War. John Ellis gained the distinction of serving close to General Pennefather's side during the war. This photograph is amongst the earliest examples of war photography. Picture: Londonderry Sentinel
A picture taken of General Pennefather along with his servant soldiers in the field during the Crimean War. John Ellis gained the distinction of serving close to General Pennefather's side during the war. This photograph is amongst the earliest examples of war photography. Picture: Londonderry Sentinel

In November 1855 the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, “in whose hands the Government has placed the nomination of chaplains for the seat of war”, appealed through the News Letter for members of the clergy to come forward to work as chaplains to soldiers serving in the Crimea War

A notice in the paper read: “The society had not been able to fill its list of 24 chaplains at the seat of war, and will gladly hear from clergymen willing and qualified to take this arduous duty. Single clergymen who have had at least two years’ experience in holy orders are generally preferred. A free passage is provided by the Government and the salary is equivalent to little less than £300.”

It was also reported that the Reverend J H Beresford Harris, BA, of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, and the Reverend J B Martin, BA, had both been appointed to chaplaincies.

Pictured in October 1989 is the Lord Mayor of Belfast Reg Empey, singer Roy Leckey and fundraiser Nina Wardle. The Lord Mayor had been the first person to hear a new record which had been produced in aid of the Shankill Activity Centre by the Shankill Musicians' Collective. Picture: News Letter archives

The Half-holiday Movement

The banks of Belfast were to close from December 1, 1855, at one o’clock, in a victory for the Half-holiday Movement.

The News Letter commented: “We have been requested to draw attention to an advertisement in our columns today, where it is announced that it is the intention of all banks in town to close, in future, at one o’clock on Saturday.”

The News Letter continued: “We are aware that the Half-holiday Committee feel themselves no little indebted to the bankers of Belfast, for the hearty manner in which they have responded to the call of the Committee.”

First Hillsborough Scouts and Guides get ready to plant hundreds of daffodil bulbs in the grounds of Hillsborough Parish Church in October 1989 to mark the 45th anniversary of the founding of the group. Pictured are, back row, from left, Ian Gilliland, nine, Joanne Helm, 12, and Victoria Mercer, 11, while at the front are Heather Hamilton, nine, Joy Sparks, 13, and Alan Baird, seven. Picture: News Letter archives

The News Letter declared: “The boon is a great one, and it is very much enhanced by the manner in which it has been granted. ”

The News Letter concluded: “One o’clock then, will be the closing hour in all the banks, on Saturday, in future. This will completely enable the different merchants in town to have their business finished, and their places of business closed at the appointed half-holiday hour, viz: - two o’clock.”

In October 1989 Margaret Sands from Newry, pictured, helped had the Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action (NICVA) launch that year's Oscar of the charity world at a gathering of business and charity leader, the winner would receive the Desmond Perpetual Trophy that November. Spokesperson Ashley McKinley told the News Letter: “It is marvellous to see a scheme such as this, acknowledging and encouraging companies and workforces who have been instrumental in developing and strengthening the link with local charities within the community.” Picture: News Letter archives