IN PICTURES: Through The Archives – looking back at October 1987

Today’s selection from the News Letter’s photo archive looks back at October 1987.

Thursday, 12th November 2020, 12:00 pm
Victoria College head girls Karen Irwin, left, and Fiona Parkes accompanied the board of governors chairwoman Joan Russell, deputy headmistress Dr C J Higginson, and headmistress Brenda Berner at a thanksgiving service which was held by the college in October 1987. Picture: News Letter archives
Victoria College head girls Karen Irwin, left, and Fiona Parkes accompanied the board of governors chairwoman Joan Russell, deputy headmistress Dr C J Higginson, and headmistress Brenda Berner at a thanksgiving service which was held by the college in October 1987. Picture: News Letter archives

Included are several photos from around Methodist College, Belfast, and Victoria College, Belfast.

There is also an old photo of the Reverend Ian Paisley who had taken up hymn-writing and a verse from his pen was to be heard by millions across Britain. Hymnal standard Rock of Ages, written by former Church of England rector Augustus Toplady in the 19th century, concluded a nationwide BBC radio service from Martyrs’ Memorial Free Presbyterian Church in Belfast. Added to the four verses by Toplady was a fifth from Rev Ian Paisley, “bringing Rock of Ages to a heavenly conclusion”.

See who you might see from days gone by.

Calculating the resistance of an electrical component at Methodist College, Belfast, in October 1987, are pupils, from left, Andrew Young from Lambeg, Richard Sefton from Comber, and Erin Logan from Ballyclare. Picture: News Letter archives

Do you have an old photograph that you would like to share? Email: [email protected].

Pictured in October 1987 is the principal of Methodist College, Belfast, Dr James Kincade. Picture: News Letter archives
Plight of homeless in Northern Ireland: Young people were warned in October 1987 to think twice before leaving home. The growing problem of youth homelessness in Northern Ireland had spiralled over the past two years, reported the News Letter. The Youth Homelessness Group in October 1987 launched A Place of Your Own, a booklet to equip young people for making one of the biggest steps in their lives. The Housing Executive said that of the 2,000 people it believed to be without a home of their own, 25 per cent were under the age of 25. Meanwhile the Simon Community had revealed that, over the previous two years, men and women under 25 formed 41 per cent of all referrals. Pictured launching the guide are, from left, Lord Blease, Geraldine O'Donnell, council for the homeless, the Reverend Norman Taggart, International Year of Shelter for the Homeless committee, and Brenda Kent, Simon Community. Picture: News Letter archives
Court jesters: Medieval minstrels, left, Noel Reilly from Malone Road, Belfast, and Billy Lyttle from Glengormley, entertain the crowd at the Lughnasa Medieval Fair at Carrickfergus in July 1992. Picture: Eddie Hanvey/News Letter archives
Knight in shining armour: Forget Jurassic Park, bury the dinosaurs, this symbol of a more chivalrous age was tops at Carrickfergus Castle for Patrick Doyle, six, left, Gerard Farelane, seven, and Pauline Rooney, seven, from 1990s. Picture: News Letter archives
It seems a long way up for Daniel Megarry, four, of Mount Merrion, Belfast, as his father Billy helps him receive a a poster at the launch of Children's Book week in 1987 at the Cornmarket, Belfast. As part of the event, city libraries had promoted a knockout quiz, the final of which was to be held later that month. Picture: News Letter archives
Gail Ireland of Hillsborough is pictured in October 1987 with a painting entitled 'My Mother age 5 years' by Lydia de Burgh of Saintfield which was on display at the annual exhibition of the Ulster Society of Women Artists in the Elmwood Hall in Belfast. Picture: News Letter archives
Among the winners of awards in the European Technological Entrepreneurial programme in October 1987 was Mr Gareth Gilchrist from Glengormley, second from left. Gareth scooped a prize for his blood clot-detecting machine. Also pictured at a Belfast hotel are Mr Declan O'Connor, a prize winner from Drogheda, Mr Winston McColgan of Co-Operation North, Mr James Doherty, Queen's University Entrepreneurs committee and Professor Fabian Monds, director of the European Technological Entrepreneurial programme. Picture: News Letter archives
The Reverend Ian Paisley had taken up hymn-writing and a verse from his pen was to be heard by millions across Britain in October 1987. Hymnal standard Rock of Ages, written by former Church of England rector Augustus Toplady in the 19th century, concluded a nationwide BBC radio service from Martyrs' Memorial Free Presbyterian Church in Belfast. Added to the four verses by Toplady was a fifth from Rev Ian Paisley, “bringing Rock of Ages to a heavenly conclusion”. He told the News Letter: “It's not the first time I've added a verse of my own to an old hymnal standard. When I was in prison in 1966 I wrote some lines on to O Love That Will Let Me Go and it is now included in the Free Presbyterian hymn book.” In jocular form, Mr Paisley added: “When I retire from politics and pastoral work I think I'll take up writing verses.” Picture: News Letter archives
Belfast's Lord Mayor Dixie Gilmore greets some of the people who completed a sponsored walk along the Lagan in aid of the Northern Ireland Hospice in October 1987. Mr Peter Quigley, administrative director of the hospice, is first from the right in the front row of this photograph. Picture: News Letter archives